ATTN: NEPA Update: Here is your opportunity to be part of Pursuing the Greater Good

Call to Action: The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) is asking for public comment as it is considering an update to its procedural provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This could have a significant impact on the process and quality of P2. We want to make a stand for good P2, why it is important and why we need to fight for it. We are asking you to be a part of “Pursuing the Greater Good” and to advocate for “Good Decisions Made Together” by providing your public comment.

Background: President Nixon signed the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) into law on January 1, 1970. Its passage established a new policy of environmental protection and transparency in government. For any federal action that will have significant environmental impacts, NEPA requires federal agencies to define a range of reasonable courses of action, including a “no action” or baseline alternative, evaluate the likely impacts of each of those alternatives, and share the results of that analysis with the public. While it has never been interpreted as obligating the government to pursue the most environmentally benign action, NEPA made the government’s decisions open to public scrutiny. The law also provided for the formation of the Council on Environmental Quality. Sec. 2 [42 U.S. Code § 4321].

Timing: Given the length of time since its NEPA implementing regulations were issued, CEQ is required to solicit public comment on potential revisions and you have an important voice. No other organization with its members and friends is better poised to contribute and advise on the update of these regulations.

Your voice is important and should be heard. But you only have until July 20th to make a difference!

Next Steps:

  1. Review the announcement
  2. Draft your reply. Need inspirations? Consider the following:
  3. Contribute to the conversation by submitting your comments online

Please pass this opportunity along to your interested colleagues. Share your posts on our Facebook pageLinkedIn and/or Twitter using #goodp2matters. Take a stand – this IS something you can do!

Here is your opportunity to be part of
Pursuing the Greater Good: Good Decisions Made Together.

May Learning Webinar: “Our Community Could Blow Up. Do We Have Time for some Quick Consultation?”

Robbie Burns’ famous prayer was for protection from “things that go ‘bump’ in the night”, but in October 2012, near Shreveport, Louisiana, it was no “bump”. It was a colossal explosion, and no one immediately knew the cause. When the cause – and the planned solution – were discovered, it touched off a different kind of fireworks.

The cause was millions of pounds of M6 explosive – the propellent used to fire large guns, like tank guns and heavy artillery – which had been stored at Camp Minden National Guard Base. It was too old to be any use – and highly unstable. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other responsible agencies planned to burn the explosives in the open – considered “best practice”. The community had other thoughts on the matter and in the social and political melee that followed, Kristi Parker Celico and Doug Sarno, MCP3, were called in to facilitate public consultation sessions to find an alternative.

Except they didn’t have the luxury of time.

BOOMThe military repeatedly reminded everyone that another major explosion could happen at any moment.

So how did Kristi and Doug manage to marshal the military, the environmental experts, the community members, the activists and the various government agencies (none of whom wanted the responsibility) and come up with a solution? The May webinar – a reprise of their presentation at the 2017 IAP2 North American Conference – is revealing, inspiring and at times hilarious (in its own macabre way) as we learn how two experienced professionals took charge of the situation and quickly but methodically brought in a solution before something else went “ka-BOOM!” in the night.

IAP2 members can watch the webinar here. (The IAP2 Webinar Archive is a benefit exclusive to members of IAP2 USA.)

April Learning Webinar: Core Values Award Winners – project categories Part 2

USA: Tennessee Department of Transportation – General Project Award for “Long Range Transportation Plan”

Tanisha & Gov Haslam

Every five years, the Tennessee Department of Transportation has to produce a 25-year long-range transportation plan, and with 6.5 million people — a third of whom live in rural areas — to serve, the challenge is to make sure public money is spent in the best way possible. Complicating matters is the sudden in-migration of people: ever since Nashville was designated an “It” city by the New York Times, 100 people move there per day.

By 2013, transportation infrastructure projects had fallen behind to the tune of $6 billion, so the problem was clear: how to come up with a plan that Tennesseans could stand behind. Tanisha Hall — TDOT’s Director of Long-Range Planning — and her staff had to reach urban and rural areas with the same message, be consistent with the outreach efforts, build input that would directly influence the decisions, and define and target traditionally underserved sectors of the population.

The tools and techniques included regional summits, focus groups and “Book-a-Planner” Outreach, where staff would take the message to local groups. They took the message to places where people traditionally met, such as Rotary and Chamber of Commerce meetings, giving people the straight goods on the challenges TDOT was facing; they questioned the people interactively on what their transportation priorities were.

Tanisha explains that they learned quite a few valuable lessons about engagement: make sure that an engagement plan is an integral part of the plan; be flexible; think through the entire process ahead of time and identify potential obstacles; and make it enjoyable.

So successful was the outreach, that towards the end of the process, Governor Bill Haslam (centre, above; looking toward Tanisha) used Tanisha’s engagement process at some of the events, which led to the legislature passing a gas tax increase to fund transportation infrastructure and TDOT won the IAP2 USA Core Values Award — General Project.


CANADA: LAWS (Liard Aboriginal Women’s Society) and Beringia Community Planning, Indigenous Engagement Award for “Youth4Safety”

Tackling the problem of violence against Indigenous women and girls in a small northern community, and making sure as many voices as possible were heard in developing a long-range, multi-modal transportation plan, were the last two Core Values Award winners featured in our monthly webinars.

In addressing a problem of sexualized violence against Aboriginal women and girls, an initiative named Youth4Safety spearheaded by the Liard Aboriginal Women’s Society (LAWS) and supported by Beringia Community Planning won the IAP2 Canada Award for Indigenous Engagement. The groups determined to make the plan local to the community, so it was relevant at all points, and to empower youth, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal.

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There are numerous barriers when it comes to engaging young people. Lack of interest is one, as is an inability of decision-makers to see the value in engaging young people; perhaps an even bigger barrier is the lack of meaningful roles for youth. The Youth4Safety project set out to overcome all of those.

Beringia’s Sarah Gillett says decision-makers often underestimate the ability of young people to contribute to a process; but in this case, they were given the key role. The project presented educational tools to help youth deal with sexualized violence, but the project also drew on the local culture and the experiences of the young people, themselves, all while ensuring the safety needed for youth to participate. They were empowered to apply what they learned in designing an awareness campaign and then share their work with the broader community.

No fewer than 16 agencies collaborated on the project, including LAWS, the RCMP, local tribal justice departments, the local high school and drug and alcohol counselling services. A unique feature of the process was that it was based in local Kaska culture, focusing on peer support, a system designed by youth for youth, and dene à nezen, which is a Kaska term to describe “dignity and respect”.

While the long term impact of their work is still to be understood, an evaluation of Youth4Safety has identified the following results to date:

For the participating youth:

  •         An ability to describe the issues relating to sexualized violence (such as gender, social responses, racism, mental health)
  •         An increased willingness and comfort talking about sexualized violence
  • An ability to identify concrete actions they can take to respond to violence against women and girls
  • An increase in concrete skills they can use to get involved in taking action on issues of sexualized violence (such as campaigning, communication, using the media)
  • Increased sense of connection among Youth – provided a network Youth trust to approach with sexualized violence issues, potential to provide support for Youth victims of sexualized violence
  • Increased confidence and self-efficacy – being a part of this team gave Youth an opportunity to build their confidence and recognize their ability to build a safer community
  • Building a stronger support network – more aware of resources, community organizations, and a network of people who care about sexualized violence against women and can help

For the broader community:

  •         Increased knowledge about violence against women and girls, the extent of the issue and the impact on Youth
  •         Increased appreciation for the knowledge Youth have on the topic of sexualized violence and the role they can play in raising awareness on this issue

 

 

Member Profile: Eric Roach

POSITION: Program Associate, American Planning Association

Where have you worked?

I currently work for the American Planning Association in the Professional Practice department. Most of my job responsibilities involve administration of the AICP Certification programs, exam prep services and anything else related to AICP.

The project that introduced me to P2 is our Community Planning Assistance Team (CPAT) program. CPAT is APA’s pro bono technical assistance program that recruits members with a specific expertise to assist communities that lack planning resources. One major aspect of every CPAT is a community engagement event involving P2. (Read more)

How long have you been in P2? What turned you on to P2 in the first place?

I joined IAP2 USA about three years ago after learning about it when a team leader on a CPAT I coordinated mentioned it. The team leader, Marijoan “MJ” Bull, spoke positively about the organization and demonstrated her P2 expertise during the community meetings. That project opened my eyes to the scope of P2 and the need to learn more so I could increase my contributions as a Project Coordinator during CPATs.

I’m currently serving on the national Training Committee and the Midwest Chapter Board as the secretary. These opportunities have allowed me to use my skills and experience with education programs at APA and allowing me to learn about the process from the volunteer side of association committees. One of my roles at APA is to assist various committees. Having the perspective from both sides has helped me with my own committee facilitation as a staff member.

If you had anything to say to someone just getting into the P2 business …

There is no need to learn from trial and error during your initial projects. IAP2 USA has a wide range of resources readily available to help you get started with successful P2. Also, the networking events and conferences have proved to be very useful by learning from P2 practitioners about their experiences.

Raise Your Hand for Good P2 – introducing the IAP2 USA Ambassador Program!

By: Stacee Adams, Ambassador Program Coordinator

Stacee AdamsA few years ago, a colleague and I presented about public participation to a group of public sector communication professionals. To kick things off, we referenced IAP2 Core Value One, “public participation is based on the belief that those who are affected by a decision have a right to be involved in the decision-making process” and asked how many attendees agreed that the public does indeed have this right. Five people raised their hands. Out of 60. 

President’s Message: Leah Jaramillo

Another annual general meeting is in the books. These meetings are always a nice way to review the progress we’ve made as an organization and an industry in the past year, as well as to answer questions and receive feedback from members. IAP2 USA continues to grow, (with membership now over 1,200), offer new programs and services and host wonderful events. In case you missed them, we had an outstanding skills symposium in San Diego last February and a stellar conference in Denver in September. In between, we launched four new online trainings and have had a series of fun and informative webinars, not to mention all the chapter meet-ups, events and conferences.

Cultural Links and Mobilizing Volunteers in P2 – The 2018 North American Conference

Register Today! xxxxx Hotel Reservations
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Schedule-at-a-Glance xxxxx Conference Details
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Become a Sponsor! xxxxx Sponsorship Application

 

What happens when your city’s growth suddenly explodes and new initiatives demand public participation? “Engagement fatigue” and staff burnout follow — that’s what. The city of Austin, Texas, has seen its population grow over the last decade to the tune of 100 people per day, and the situation has not been helped by often vitriolic divisions of opinion.

The solution? The Conversation Corps: a team of trained volunteer facilitators, dedicated to promoting civil dialogue and pushing the envelope of P2 best practices. We’re excited to welcome folks from Austin with P2 is a Team Sport, the story of their five-year journey. You’ll get some on-the-ground insights on promoting a culture of civil discourse and how to work with other agencies to grow a P2 culture.

Vancouver, BC, is famous for its Chinatown, but that historic community has felt itself in danger of being swallowed up by the rapid growth of the city. Public processes have failed to be inclusive, leading to distrust and loss of community support for projects and plans.

In Inclusive Engagement with Vancouver’s Chinatown, Miranda Eng of Context Research will share their recent collaborative work with community members from Vancouver’s Chinatown to co-create a model to guide culturally respectful planning and design of engagement processes.

Those are two of nearly 30 sessions, plus workshops, panel discussions and field trips at the 2018 IAP2 North American Conference, Sept. 5 – 7 in Victoria, BC. Read more about the Conference and take a look at the Schedule-at-a-Glance to see what’s on offer.

Watch for more news about the conference and the events you can look forward to, and follow #iap2nac18 on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.

Remember: register on or before June 30, and take advantage of the early-bird registration rates! And book your room soon at one of our three partner hotels: they’ll be going fast!

P2 and Disaster Response – IAP2 May Learning Webinar

It sounds like a no-brainer: a stash of millions of pounds of highly-unstable explosives is threatening a town and some explosions have already gone off. Quick! Turn the experts loose to find the solution and act on it! No time to sound out ordinary people on what they think should be done!

But that was exactly the situation in one town in the USA recently, and the experts who studied the problem came back with a “solution” that was even worse and left the area vulnerable to a catastrophic blast.

So they “paused” and took it to the people.

In our May webinar on May 8, at 11:00 AM PDT (2:00 PM EDT), Kristi Celico and Doug Sarno, MCP3, will reprise their presentation from the 2017 IAP2 North American Conference in Denver, will discuss how they helped achieve “consensus in a hurry”, which addressed the issue and averted a disaster. How do you weigh the risks and benefits and make sure local residents are involved in the decision?

Join us to find out how this community solved the problem and how you can apply that to your own work. Register here, and remember the two-stage process to register: follow the link in your registration confirmation email to get the login information you’ll need.

Looking forward to you joining us on May 8!

A New Initiative for IAP2 USA: The Ambassador Program!

Growing Good P2 one Connection at a Time

Stacee AdamsBy: Stacee Adams

The shortest distance between two people is often a story, and IAP2 USA is launching a new Ambassador Program to recruit storytellers and others interested in creating new relationships that further the reach of “good P2”.
The Ambassador Program is being piloted in 2018 by the Communications Committee with the goals of recruiting a core of ambassadors from across the U.S. to raise awareness of what good P2 is and what it looks like; support strategic alliance building; and work with cities and project owners to sign Core Values pledges.
The pilot launches this month with a national recruitment for participants. Ambassadors will be incentivized with resources including a toolkit, professional development, training, networking and recognition in IAP2 promotional materials and at the North American Conference. Requirements to participate include joining quarterly conference calls, tracking IAP2 marketing activities and securing Core Values pledges.
Are you interested in being an Ambassador and have a story about IAP2 and its impact in your work? If so, send us an email about your interest in joining the program. We’ll be collecting responses through April 15.

Midwest Chapter Announces Conference Schedule

The Midwest Chapter is hosting a regional conference, in partnership with the American Planning Association, May 3-4, 2018 in Chicago.

Join Midwest Chapter members and friends from around the region for great professional development, networking, and learning opportunities. We’ll kick off with a Thursday evening social, then a busy Friday: concurrent morning sessions, our Annual Chapter Meeting over lunch, more great learning sessions in the afternoon, and the chance to spend your evening with new friends and colleagues.