Member Profile: Eric Roach

POSITION: Program Associate, American Planning Association

Where have you worked?

I currently work for the American Planning Association in the Professional Practice department. Most of my job responsibilities involve administration of the AICP Certification programs, exam prep services and anything else related to AICP.

The project that introduced me to P2 is our Community Planning Assistance Team (CPAT) program. CPAT is APA’s pro bono technical assistance program that recruits members with a specific expertise to assist communities that lack planning resources. One major aspect of every CPAT is a community engagement event involving P2. (Read more)

How long have you been in P2? What turned you on to P2 in the first place?

I joined IAP2 USA about three years ago after learning about it when a team leader on a CPAT I coordinated mentioned it. The team leader, Marijoan “MJ” Bull, spoke positively about the organization and demonstrated her P2 expertise during the community meetings. That project opened my eyes to the scope of P2 and the need to learn more so I could increase my contributions as a Project Coordinator during CPATs.

I’m currently serving on the national Training Committee and the Midwest Chapter Board as the secretary. These opportunities have allowed me to use my skills and experience with education programs at APA and allowing me to learn about the process from the volunteer side of association committees. One of my roles at APA is to assist various committees. Having the perspective from both sides has helped me with my own committee facilitation as a staff member.

If you had anything to say to someone just getting into the P2 business …

There is no need to learn from trial and error during your initial projects. IAP2 USA has a wide range of resources readily available to help you get started with successful P2. Also, the networking events and conferences have proved to be very useful by learning from P2 practitioners about their experiences.

Member Profile – Mahina Martin

POSITION: Director of Government & Community Relations Maui Electric

I believe that the public deserves a voice, and I also believe that not all governments and companies are ill-intended. There’s so much energy spent on conflict, and we have better things to do, like being with our families, having fun, pursuing personal passions; so participating with so little time and interest can get in the way. I also like that P2 is a good way to guide a process to a good resolution.

Member Profile: Ben Ettelman

Assistant Research Scientist, Texas A&M Transportation Institute

How long have you been in P2, and where have you worked?

I started with Morris Communications in Portland, Maine. I was an English major, with a knack for writing, so after I graduated I took this job as my primary role was producing meeting minutes. I was immediately interested in the field and planning and public engagement and my role with MC grew from taking meeting minutes, to being involved in all aspects of the P2 process, as well as the planning activities for the projects we worked on.

I went to graduate school at the University of Texas, Austin, to earn my masters in Urban Planning and when I went to TTI, I found a mix of planning and applied P2. At TTI, we conduct research that improves the state of the practice for P2 by allowing us to test innovative methods in the field. This includes developing and testing performance measures for P2 and incorporating more technology into public involvement processes.

One example was a virtual open house we designed for the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), where we used a live chat feature to replicate the experience of an in person public meeting in a virtual setting.

What was the state of P2 when you first arrived in Texas?

When I moved there five years ago, I was curious to see whether the culture of public involvement would be different from the Northeast. The transportation agencies in Central Texas were doing a lot of work, as the region is growing rapidly. The challenge in Central Texas, which I found was not unique to this area, was bringing together the many different interests throughout the region.