IAP2 USA Responds to NEPA: Are you?

The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) has extended its comment period to 08/20/2018. The CEQ has posed six questions to the public regarding the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This could have a significant impact on the process and quality of P2. We want to make a stand for good P2, why it is important and why we need to fight for it. For this reason, IAP2 USA has elected to provide feedback on Question 6:

Question 6: Should the provisions in CEQ’s NEPA regulations relating to public involvement be revised to be more inclusive and efficient, and if so, how?

We as a community are uniquely poised to respond. We are asking you to be a part of “Pursuing the Greater Good” and to advocate for “Good Decisions Made Together” by responding to the NEPA request for comment.

The IAP2 USA Board has put together its own comment letter and we hope that this will encourage you to do the same. Please take a look and feel free to use comments/sections that resonate with you in your responses.

View Board comment letter to NEPA!

Not sure what this is all about? Learn more: https://wp.me/p8pbvC-8Y

Interested in submitting your comments and feedback directly to the CEQ? All comments must be submitted online by August 20, 2018.

Thank you for spreading the practice of “good P2!”

A New Initiative for IAP2 USA: The Ambassador Program!

Growing Good P2 one Connection at a Time

Stacee AdamsBy: Stacee Adams

The shortest distance between two people is often a story, and IAP2 USA is launching a new Ambassador Program to recruit storytellers and others interested in creating new relationships that further the reach of “good P2”.
The Ambassador Program is being piloted in 2018 by the Communications Committee with the goals of recruiting a core of ambassadors from across the U.S. to raise awareness of what good P2 is and what it looks like; support strategic alliance building; and work with cities and project owners to sign Core Values pledges.
The pilot launches this month with a national recruitment for participants. Ambassadors will be incentivized with resources including a toolkit, professional development, training, networking and recognition in IAP2 promotional materials and at the North American Conference. Requirements to participate include joining quarterly conference calls, tracking IAP2 marketing activities and securing Core Values pledges.
Are you interested in being an Ambassador and have a story about IAP2 and its impact in your work? If so, send us an email about your interest in joining the program. We’ll be collecting responses through April 15.

Member Profile – Mahina Martin

POSITION: Director of Government & Community Relations Maui Electric

I believe that the public deserves a voice, and I also believe that not all governments and companies are ill-intended. There’s so much energy spent on conflict, and we have better things to do, like being with our families, having fun, pursuing personal passions; so participating with so little time and interest can get in the way. I also like that P2 is a good way to guide a process to a good resolution.

Fresh insights & multiple perspectives on public engagement!

More and more people, from many walks of life, are standing up to be counted on issues that affect them. That means those involved in public participation are called on to develop new and wide-ranging skill sets.

The 2018 IAP2 USA Skills Symposium — Feb. 26 – March 2 in Austin, TX — boasts a variety of one- and two-day courses, all in an environment of sharing and networking among P2 practitioners. Just look at some of the offerings:

“When Things Go Sideways” (1 day)

Conflict is generally a given in public forums, but sometimes the best-laid plans can come off the rails. How do you take anger and frustration and channel them into an environment for constructive engagement? This course explores tools and techniques for embracing high emotion in public settings. You’ll increase your self-awareness about personal reactions and responses to other people’s emotions. Register here.

Greater LA Chapter: Using “Gentle” and Art-Centered P2 to Reach Under-Represented Communities

Earlier this month, the Greater Los Angeles Chapter held its inaugural training event, attracting over forty planners and government staff as well as P2 practitioners. After a brief presentation describing his methodology, James Rojas, Founder of Place It! and Co-Founder of the Latino Urban Forum, guided attendees into the substance of his workshop. Attendees gathered around tables piled high with colorful, enticing materials first turning their favorite childhood memories, then their dreams for a sustainable Los Angeles, into art. As participants shared their childhood memories, their storhighlighted the similarities among all of us.

“Building” a sustainable Los Angeles out of art material is where participants become meaningful contributors to the plan for their region. James says, “Everyone is an urban planner in their heart and it’s our job to create a safe space for participants to reveal, respect, and translate their knowledge and experiences into the city building process.”

The training proved to be a big draw for the Greater Los Angeles chapter’s membership, breaking all records for Chapter meeting attendees. Kit Cole, Chapter President and IAP2 USA Board Member, commented, “There is a big appetite for skill development in the region, not only among P2 professionals but for others whose jobs are increasingly requiring them to exercise public engagement tactics.”

Since the Los Angeles Chapter started in 2015, the group has focused on  building awareness of P2 in general and building the IAP2 brand specifically.  Training is now the next step in the LA Chapter’s plan for increasing professionalism across the practice in Southern California.

Wendy Nowak of Placeworks, host of the October event, is working to meet a parallel demand for training in Orange County where she is starting an Orange County chapter for IAP2 USA.  She and Kit are coordinating for future training events to meet the escalating desire for public engagement skills in the region.


Would you like to connect with us? Find us online on our Facebook Page or sign up for our newsletter by emailing greaterla@iap2usa.org!

President’s Message

Nominations are now open for several positions on the IAP2 USA Board of Directors. Have you considered submitting? If you haven’t, you definitely should. Why? Because you’ll have the opportunity to:

  • work with your peers to advance the practice
  • make a real impact on P2 practice in the US
  • get involved in issues you care about
  • learn what is happening with P2 nationally and internationally
  • and perhaps best of all, work with some of the best, brightest, and most fun people in the field.

Getting to the Heart of the Matter when Dealing with Emotion, Outrage and Opposition

By Lauren Wirtis, IAP2 USA Intern

Nelson Mandela once said, “If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart.” He was so right. When you make the effort to speak someone else’s language, even if it’s just basic phrases here and there, you are saying to them, “I understand that you have a culture and identity that exists beyond me. I see you as a human being.” – “Born a Crime” by Trevor Noah

Language is how we communicate with one another and, since it is how we communicate, it is often the fodder for our emotions. Our hearts swell when someone says they love us for the first time, we weep when we confront terrible news, we laugh when we are told a joke, and we are enraged when we are presented with injustice.

When IAP2 originally created the Foundations course, John Godec was the principal writer of the section that discussed risk communication and dealing with upset people. Frequently, the trainers would receive feedback that they wanted to spend more time on this section. In response to this demand Stephani Roy McCallum, John Godec, and Mary Hamel created a class called Emotion and Outrage in Public Participation (recently retitled Strategies for Dealing with Opposition and Outrage in P2).

“The course is about human behavior. It’s about social psychology. About the psychology of people and people’s perception. How people perceive and interpret information differently depending on their emotional state.” -John Godec

Much of the content in the class on risk communication comes from Dr. Peter Sandman, an expert in the area whose model of risk is Risk = Hazard + Outrage. Dr. Sandman discusses three types of  risk communication that can be understood by mapping where they fall on a chart of outrage and hazard, see the image below.

Much of the content in the class on risk communication comes from Dr. Peter Sandman, an expert in the area whose model of risk is Risk = Hazard + Outrage. Dr. Sandman discusses three types of  risk communication that can be understood by mapping where they fall on a chart of outrage and hazard, see the image left.

See Dr. Peter Sandman’s full video on this topic here.

This is a helpful tool that provides a practical approach to managing people’s outrage. However, when I think about the kind of outrage that troubles the United States today, I can’t help but think that there is a third dimension to this chart. A z-axis that acknowledges that hazards are not experienced evenly across populations. And while we have made a lot of progress on a range of issues, I would also say that this progress was made without acknowledging the z-axis and, to Trevor Noah’s point, only in one language and that is the language of a group that is predominantly upper class, white, and male. As a result, we have left certain important pieces of issues unresolved and unacknowledged and all we know is that the solutions have supposedly “created jobs” or “grew the GDP.” These aren’t words that go to my heart.

I had the privilege of speaking with John Godec and Stephani Roy McCallum to understand how they believed the patterns of opposition and outrage have changed and what they think we can do about it. Do they see patterns in the opposition and outrage they encounter in their work? Yes. And more of it. John said that he believed a lot of this growth comes from the widening gap between the government and the governed. That gap has fostered a large amount of distrust fueled by rhetoric citing government as the issue rather than the problem and the fact that government doesn’t work well for many people. However, the closer people are to government services, the more likely they are to trust their government, which means somewhere there’s a fundamental breakdown in communication.

Stephani pointed out that these highly charged spaces are also more visible than ever with the support of social media, with more people engaging in the demonization of people who they view as “on the other side.” She went on to say that this is not an experience unique to the United States, but is occurring across the globe. “[The political situation in the United States] is just a bellwether of that shift.”

Taken all at once, these issues are incredibly daunting. What can we, as P2 practitioners, do to manage outrage and opposition in our own communities?

1. Go beyond the project level.

Dealing with emotion and outrage successfully is “about the whole system changing not just about completing a project,” says Stephani. She noted that this is a big challenge in P2, that so much of the focus is on the project level, which is not a way to change people’s hearts and minds. Emotion and outrage are often closely tied to a lack of trust. It’s important to do good P2 even when the public isn’t going to be upset and when you aren’t asking anything of them. Put goodwill in the bank over time, rather than starting from a position of asking for newfound trust at the beginning of each project.

2. Do your due diligence.

If there is one thing that John and Stephani taught me, it’s that there is no excuse for not knowing about opposition. None. You should never be surprised by the fact that there is opposition. To make sure this carnal offense never happens, do your due diligence. Talk to the community and ask them who else you should talk to. John said “the ability to predict how people are going to feel about a project is critical to the process.” Get out there and get to know your community!

3. Don’t underestimate your community.

Believe it or not, people want to help. Stephani said that she enjoys working in spaces with high emotion, because they “are spaces of opportunity and possibility; when people have passion, they give you something to work with.” An example of this is a story John told me about a transportation project in Arizona. A major intersection was going to be redesigned and would shut down access to downtown for 18 months. An environmental study predicted this work would lead to the closure of 15 local businesses. Originally the approach was an informational campaign, but then John brought the stakeholders into a room together with local residents and business owners to talk about any possible ways to mitigate the impacts. They adjusted, tweaked, and pushed the schedule around in a way that was able to “minimize anger and optimize the situation.” This was supplemented with a targeted promotional effort for the businesses that were going to be impacted the most. After much relationship- and trust-building, the community was determined to support these businesses. In the end six businesses opened, zero failed. Never underestimate a community’s ability to be creative and pull together.

4. Put down the templates

IAP2 courses on emotion, outrage, and opposition will provide new ways of thinking about these issues and will provide tools and approaches to try. They will also help you think about how you show up to a meeting and what issues you and your organization are dealing with. Stephani said, “the course is a powerful first step in thinking differently and learning how to approach opposition and polarization in a different way. But it is not a magic wand.” Sometimes people think that if they fill out enough forms or the poster boards are good enough that it will overcome the outrage, but that will never be the case because then you are speaking a language they understand rather than their language. Stephani worked on a project in Canada dealing with conflict about language, a highly polarized issue rooted in identity, and she said “it is not about results or facts. It’s about the culture of communities. For this, we need a model for having brave and honest conversations.” In her work to unpack this issue and transform the nature of the conflict, Stephani worked with participants to create a story-based process where they could share their experiences- good, bad, and ugly. There is no template for doing this, but effective and successful P2 will help participants see the whole person and not just the issue.

5.Relax, nothing is under control

Over-reliance on tools, process steps, and check boxes will gain you the illusion of control, but lose, as Stephani pointed out, “the heart, soul, and complexity of the issue.” It also, as John pointed out, makes you “lose sight of the fact that there are real human beings affected by what [you] do.” There is no magic formula for avoiding outrage. If opposition (that, hopefully, you were anticipating) arises, stop. Talk to people. Give them individual or small group attention and consideration. John noted that “the worst thing you could do is hold a public meeting.” This is an opportunity to build trust for both you and your community, and it is important to be able to trust them enough to give the control away. As Stephani said, “The messier it is, the more there is to work with.”

There is a lot of despair here in the United States and around the world. Despair created by nature, by humankind, and a combination of the two. I spent the last week surrounded by P2 practitioners at the North American Conference hosted by IAP2 USA and Canada, but attended by people from Australia, New Zealand, Indonesia, South Africa, Europe – and those are just the people I personally encountered. Each one of these people attended the conference to become better at showing their communities not what makes them different, but what they have in common with one another. It certainly gave me hope to know we’d all land back home re-energized and ready to expand our community vocabulary.

Thank you to John Godec and Stephani Roy McCallum for taking time to speak with me about their experience designing the EOP2 course and their personal experiences dealing with emotion and outrage in communities.

John Godec
John Godec, Co-creator of Emotion & Outrage in P2, Expert Communication and Strategist and Facilitator at The Participation Company
Stephani Roy McCallum
Stephani Roy McCallum, Co-creator of Emotion & Outrage in P2, Chief Storm Rider at Courageous Leadership Project, and Knowledge Director at Dialogue Partners
Lauren Wirtis, 2017 IAP2 USA Intern & Author

Celebrating the Greater Good!

A new award to celebrate excellence in the field of public participation in the US. This is your chance to nominate an individual who has exerted outstanding leadership, service, and application of IAP2’s core values. Do you know someone who is worthy of this accolade. The deadline for applications is August 31st. We will be recognizing the winner at the IAP2 North American Conference in Denver this September.

Send in your nomination

IAP2 USA offers new Online Courses!

Social media is a beast! There is so much trial and error when it comes to emerging tools. Why not reduce the footwork and increase your knowledge! Join us this September in “Social Media & Public Participation” with Susanna Haas Lyons! This online course will cover:

  • foundational concepts of digital engagement,
  • consider its benefits and risks,
  • and explore strategic frameworks for determining which online tools to use.

You will learn the basics of how content gets seen on social media, and have an opportunity to strengthen the impact of your social media posts.

Evaluation should always be useful“Evaluation & Public Participation” will cover theories and practical strategies to help you evaluate your public participation efforts. In this online course, you will examine the differences between process and impact evaluation, and review the components of a basic evaluation plan. You will craft evaluation questions, identify indicators and consider sources of information to help you answer those questions. Above all, you will learn how to employ evaluative thinking as a learning strategy, in order to strengthen your work and achieve greater impact!