P2 and Disaster Response – IAP2 May Learning Webinar

It sounds like a no-brainer: a stash of millions of pounds of highly-unstable explosives is threatening a town and some explosions have already gone off. Quick! Turn the experts loose to find the solution and act on it! No time to sound out ordinary people on what they think should be done!

But that was exactly the situation in one town in the USA recently, and the experts who studied the problem came back with a “solution” that was even worse and left the area vulnerable to a catastrophic blast.

So they “paused” and took it to the people.

In our May webinar on May 8, at 11:00 AM PDT (2:00 PM EDT), Kristi Celico and Doug Sarno, MCP3, will reprise their presentation from the 2017 IAP2 North American Conference in Denver, will discuss how they helped achieve “consensus in a hurry”, which addressed the issue and averted a disaster. How do you weigh the risks and benefits and make sure local residents are involved in the decision?

Join us to find out how this community solved the problem and how you can apply that to your own work. Register here, and remember the two-stage process to register: follow the link in your registration confirmation email to get the login information you’ll need.

Looking forward to you joining us on May 8!

WEBINAR REWIND: February 2018 – “Handling Emotion and Outrage in Public Participation”

When dealing with conflict and entrenched opinions, do you look for the root causes of the entrenchment? In our February webinar, “Handling Emotion and Outrage in P2”, John Godec, MCP3, looked at some of the reasons why people become polarized in their opinions and why they hold those particular opinions in the first place.

A new benefit for IAP2 USA members: recordings of our webinars are now available exclusively to IAP2 USA members. Check out these and other recorded webinars here.

(One of the IAP2 “Flagship” courses is “Strategies for Dealing with Opposition and Outrage in P2” – formerly known as EOP2 – but this should not be confused with this webinar.)

John pointed out that many of the issues P2 practitioners face today are not new. At the 1997 IAP2 Conference in Phoenix, Chris Gates, president of the National Civic League, described a society made up of angry citizens, ruthless media, broken politics, cynicism and old approaches, as well, Gates added, as “an assumption of bad intent by business and government leaders.”

Sixty years earlier, John noted, Dale Carnegie, the “How to Win Friends and Influence People” guy, stated that “When dealing with people, remember that you are not dealing with creatures of logic, but with creatures of emotion, creatures bristling with prejudice and motivated by pride and vanity.”

John’s research into these root causes, in part, came from trying to understand his own family, many of whom he calls “über-conservatives”. It’s taken him into realms of neuroscience and human behavior, and the work of people like Dr Gail Saltz, a psychiatrist, and Dr. Jonathan Haidt a social psychologist who identify biological differences in brain function between people who hold conservative views and those who self identify as more liberal. In other words, people often become polarized and entrenched in their socio-political positions because they are wired that way.

Grasping that concept and learning to deal with it leads to better thinking when planning a P2 process that you know will be controversial and bring out wildly opposing factions, ensuring that certain voices are not allowed to dominate the scene.

IAP2 USA Members can view this webinar online at: https://iap2usa.org/2018webinars

Note: Members must be logged in to view this content.

 

Webinar Rewind – March 2018: Core Values Award Winners – project categories

Camille Morse Nicholson headshotAlthough climate change is on the minds of pretty much everybody, one group has been routinely left out of the policy conversation: rural residents. Farmers, ranchers and others who live outside our big cities have found that policy designed by urban and suburban interests often fails to address the distinctive realities and challenges they experience.

The Saint Paul, Minnesota-based Jefferson Center joined with the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy to create the “Rural Climate Dialogues”, in which people in three rural Minnesota communities hosted Citizen Juries to deliberate on the topic of climate and extreme weather, and create solutions that worked for them.

Camille Morse Nicholson, Program Coordinator at the Jefferson Center, outlined some of the different techniques required to build community support in advance of the dialogue, facilitate the jury’s work, and support the communities in their follow-up. Although a divisive debate is a possibility with such a politically-loaded topic, one participant remarked, “there was no political/ideological divisiveness: everything was done with respect and in good order.”

The dialogues continue with a focus on the future of energy in rural Minnesota, and the project has already won the Core Values Award for “Creativity and Innovation.”


Dealing with the prospect of closing schools is a touchy subject in the best of conditions, but throw in language and other cultural differences, and things get even trickier.

Rockandel bio pict_sm (1)That was the challenge faced by the Richmond BC School District when faced with the need to do seismic upgrading on their buildings, in a zone identified as prone to liquefaction in case of an earthquake. The potential hit to the budget meant a real potential for closing some schools. This meant taking it to the people, which led to a Core Values Award for the District and Catherine Rockandel of Rockandel and Associates.

The Award — for “Respect for Diversity, Inclusion and Culture” — recognized the work done to reach out to families in a place where sixty percent of households do not have English as a first language. Languages in Richmond include Mandarin, Cantonese, Taiwanese, Tagalog, Punjabi and some Japanese. Moreover, many of the immigrants come from cultures which mistrust governments and officialdom in general.

What tools and techniques did they use to encourage people to take part and trust that their voices are being heard and taken seriously? How did they reach a conclusion in which no schools were closed?

IAP2 USA Members can view this webinar online at: https://iap2usa.org/2018webinars

Note: Members must be logged in to view this content.

 

 

Webinar Rewind – “Denver Encore: Beginning with the Brain in Mind”

A growing challenge for a P2 practitioner is the deepening ideological divide that has developed over the past few decades. As people become more and more entrenched in their view and less and less likely to consider those of others, engaging the broadest cross-section of the public becomes more and more difficult.

Dr Martin Carcasson with the Center for Public Deliberation at Colorado State University says finding a solution begins with understanding the root of the problem – the “brain science” behind polarization – and the December webinar was an encore of his presentation at the 2017 IAP2 North American Conference, “Beginning With The Brain In Mind”.

carcasson - books
Lots of books have been written on the subject

Our human nature makes things problematic, Carcasson says. We crave certainty and consistency, and if we’re making a decision in a controversial or even polarized environment, we tend to protect that decision as much as possible, even in the face of contrary facts.

What’s more, people are suckers for the good-versus-evil narrative – through all cultures and all times, we love the hero-and-villain scenario, and Carcasson says that we’re teaching our children wrong by teaching them that there is an evil force behind bad things, when really, it’s more complicated than that.

We are “groupish” or tribal, preferring to associate with like-minded people. Some of the worst things – and some of the best things – that humans have done in history have stemmed from that mind-set.

Call for Session Proposals!

IAP2 Canada and IAP2 USA are seeking session proposals for the 7th Annual IAP2 North American Conference to be held September 5-7, 2018 in Victoria, BC, Canada.

This is an opportunity to explore the theme, Growing a Culture of P2, with content focusing on topics that Innovate, Inspire, Include, Influence, and Imagine!

Please review the Call for Session Proposals first as it contains information on what the Program Committee is looking for and tips on what to include in your Session Proposal Application.

The majority of the sessions will be in English, however, we plan to include some bilingual sessions. Please indicate in the application if you would like to make your presentation in French and English (simultaneous interpretation will not be provided).

The deadline to submit a proposal is Monday, February 12, 2018!

Webinar Rewind – November 2017: IAP2 Projects of the Year

You have a project. It can benefit a lot of people, but for whatever reason, you run into a major roadblock: hostility from the very people it’s supposed to benefit. How do you approach these roadblocks and overcome that hostility?

The November Learning Webinar featured the winners of the IAP2 Core Values Awards for Project of the Year, and both of these had to address a very skeptical public. In fact, the City of Calgary had to shut down its plan to upgrade the Crowchild Trail – a major transportation corridor from the north end of the city to the south – because of hostility from the public. And the Mental Health Center of Denver learned to change one often-used term and leave out another altogether, in order to create a branch in an impoverished area of the Mile-High City.

Year End President’s Message

As we reflect on the things we are thankful for, IAP2 USA would like to thank its members for regularly providing input and feedback on the services and programs we provide. You are taking the surveys, filling out evaluations, sharing social media posts and emailing suggestions. So, thank you for being engaged and communicating with us regularly!

The feedback you have provided through the membership survey, conference and program evaluations and via individual comments have been reviewed and incorporated into the updated IAP2 USA Strategic Plan (2018-2020). We are pleased to report that significant progress has been made since the creation of the 2015-2017 Strategic Plan and we continue to advocate for best practices in public participation, for the professionalization of the field and remain the organization of choice for good P2.

Do you want to be a certified Public Participation Professional? Apply now and save money!

Do you have what it takes to become a Certified Public Participation Professional (CP3)?

Knowing and showing that you provide quality P2 is key in today’s marketplace. Certification is your way to do so. If you have taken the IAP2 Foundations course (formerly the Certificate training), have experience delivering good P2, and are ready to have your work assessed by a panel of your professional peers, then it is time to get certified.

The IAP2 Certification Program is a rigorous assessment of your skills and capabilities. Over the past several years, with help from our worldwide membership the IAP2 USA Certification Task Force has developed 5 Core Competencies. These Core Competencies are used to assess whether you have what it takes to be certified as a CP3.

Meet your 2018-2020 Board Candidates

Members, we have some incredible candidates for you to choose from and we hope that you will take the time to get to know them a little bit better before you vote. The following is a quick snapshot of the 2018-2020 Board candidates – please click on their information links to learn more. Deadline for member voting is Monday, December 4th via Election Buddy.

We want to apologize for any confusion with the Election Buddy invitation you received yesterday– unfortunately, this was sent out with a draft ballot. We have now closed the Wednesday election process – none of those votes will count. Today we sent you a new invite. Please use the new ballot to vote for your preferred candidates. If you have any further questions please contact Anneliese at info@iap2usa.org.

Meet your board candidates…

President’s Message

Nominations are now open for several positions on the IAP2 USA Board of Directors. Have you considered submitting? If you haven’t, you definitely should. Why? Because you’ll have the opportunity to:

  • work with your peers to advance the practice
  • make a real impact on P2 practice in the US
  • get involved in issues you care about
  • learn what is happening with P2 nationally and internationally
  • and perhaps best of all, work with some of the best, brightest, and most fun people in the field.