IAP2’s Change Journey: a message from Kylie Cochrane, Federation Presiding Member

To all IAP2 members, trainers and staff,

As you may be aware, IAP2 has been going through an important and ambitious change-journey over the last twelve months.

This time last year, the IAP2 Federation Board launched a process of re-design to help us articulate and create the organisation that we want to be – a sustainable and dynamic international association for engagement professionals. This process was led by a diverse working group of members and trainers. This work started in Denver, at the time of the 2017 North American Conference. Out of these two days came the ‘change committee’ – a group of volunteers tasked with scoping the change and shaping the future of IAP2.

With the input of your regional boards and the international board, the change committee came up with seven strategic priority areas and a series of recommendations that will enable us to reshape our international collaborative network that lives and abides by the IAP2 core values. You were invited to give feedback on the strategic priority areas and recommendations via an online engagement platform. Your input was fed into high-level discussions with representatives from each regional board earlier this month in Victoria, Canada. We now have seven endorsed strategic priority areas and 36 endorsed recommendations (read it here – I’ve deliberately kept the track changes so you can see what was discussed/ changed).

I’m really excited about these strategic priority areas and recommendations. They will ensure that the future IAP2 will place significant focus on advocating for and growing engagement practice around the world – both in terms of expanding engagement in new regions, as well as ensuring that IAP2 remains at the cutting edge of new engagement developments including innovations in tools, techniques and technologies. The recommendations propose that training can be developed and delivered anywhere around the world – and a global committee be tasked with ensuring high quality and consistency for all IAP2 products. Better international connections will be achieved through communities of practice and sharing of lessons learned across the IAP2 global community. In summary, these strategic priority areas will enable us to become the future-focused international professional organisation that we want to be.

However, there is a lot of work to be done over the next 6-12 months. This is where you come in. We need your expertise and experience to help us consider and explore the detail required to reshape IAP2.

We have divided the work into four key committees and we are looking for committee volunteers from IAP2’s global body of members, trainers and staff. Team leaders have been identified for each committee. Their first task will be to develop a work plan and, along with their respective committees, to nominate a chair and co-chair between now and the end of October 2018. Work will continue until at least March 2019 as each committee develops a detailed implementation plan for the agreed recommendations.

Please consider volunteering for only one committee as we anticipate the workload will be a few hours per week for several months. Thank you also to those of you who have already volunteered to be involved in committees. But we need loads more volunteers – so if you are interested please get in touch. The team leaders and committee members so far are;

  1. Advocacy and emerging practice
    • Team leads – Tim Hart THart@SRK.co.za and John Poynton poynton100@gmail.com
    • Committee members so far – Aldi Alizar, Bruce Gilbert, Lerato Ratsoenyane, Lucy Cole-Edelstein, Margie Harvey, Martin de los Rios, Steven Mamphekgo, Thato Shale
  1. Brand and member value
    • Team leads – Cathy Smith Catherine.Smith@cityworks.biz and Catherine Rockandel cat@growpartnerships.com
    • Committee members so far – Anton Febian Taufik, Ellen Ernst, Kate Vallence, Lisa Carlson, Marion Short, Myles Alexander, Rachel Edginton, Rob Gravestocks, Tanya Burdett
  1. Training and professional development
    • Team leads – Richard Delaney delaney@rmdelaney.com, Amanda Newbery amanda.newbery@articulous.com.au and Ken SmithKSEServices@goalnet.co.za
    • Committee members so far – Alice Sherring, Cassie Hemphill, Deanna Desedas, Fran Morris, Gay Robinson, Grace Leotta, Joel Levin, John Godec, Kylie Cochrane, Mary Moreland, Ratih Damayanti, Susan George, Tannis Topolnisky, Wendy Lowe
  1. Governance
    • Team leads – Mandi Davidson mldavidson3020@gmail.com, Sarah Rivest sarahjrivest@gmail.com and Doug Sarno doug@forumfg.com
    • Committee members so far – Amelia Shaw, Ann Carrol, Jan Bloomfield, Jay Vincent, Lara Tierney, Michelle Feenan, Marty Rozelle

A few of you have asked who are the decision makers. For this stage of the change process there will be decision makers on several levels – at the committee level and at the regional board level. Specifically, the scope of each committee will be decided by members of that committee. The scope will be endorsed by the steering committee which will be made up of chairs and co-chairs of each committee, key IAP2 staff and myself. The international board will continue to oversee the overall change journey and regional boards will continue to be the overall decision makers. You will note we are using new language to describe our organisational model. Instead of using the words federation and affiliates, we are now using the words international and regional.

I would like to thank the members of the change committee who have driven the first 12 months of our change journey. The change committee will now be disbanded but their work (and all of these individuals) will continue through the four committees and/or the steering committee. Please join me in thanking Aldi Alizar, Amelia Shaw, Bruce Gilbert, Doug Sarno, Ellen Ernst, Jay Vincent, John Poynton, Kate Vallance, Mandi Davidson, Martin de los Rios, Marty Rozelle, Richard Delaney, Sarah Rivest and Tim Hart.

For those of you who are yet to get involved and/ or who have views on this change process, I strongly encourage you to get involved asap. This change process is deliberately designed to be inclusive and flexible however it does have a distinct timeframe and end date. So if you have a view and/ or want to get involved, now is the time.

If you have any questions, concerns and/ or would like to volunteer, please do not hesitate to contact me, committee team leads or your regional or international board representatives.

Thank you for your ongoing passion and dedication to expanding and professionalising P2/ engagement.

K

Kylie Cochrane

International Chair

International Association of Public Participation

M +61 404048369

Kylie.Cochrane@aurecongroup.com

IAP2 USA Responds to NEPA: Are you?

The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) has extended its comment period to 08/20/2018. The CEQ has posed six questions to the public regarding the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This could have a significant impact on the process and quality of P2. We want to make a stand for good P2, why it is important and why we need to fight for it. For this reason, IAP2 USA has elected to provide feedback on Question 6:

Question 6: Should the provisions in CEQ’s NEPA regulations relating to public involvement be revised to be more inclusive and efficient, and if so, how?

We as a community are uniquely poised to respond. We are asking you to be a part of “Pursuing the Greater Good” and to advocate for “Good Decisions Made Together” by responding to the NEPA request for comment.

The IAP2 USA Board has put together its own comment letter and we hope that this will encourage you to do the same. Please take a look and feel free to use comments/sections that resonate with you in your responses.

View Board comment letter to NEPA!

Not sure what this is all about? Learn more: https://wp.me/p8pbvC-8Y

Interested in submitting your comments and feedback directly to the CEQ? All comments must be submitted online by August 20, 2018.

Thank you for spreading the practice of “good P2!”

Raise Your Hand for Good P2 – introducing the IAP2 USA Ambassador Program!

By: Stacee Adams, Ambassador Program Coordinator

Stacee AdamsA few years ago, a colleague and I presented about public participation to a group of public sector communication professionals. To kick things off, we referenced IAP2 Core Value One, “public participation is based on the belief that those who are affected by a decision have a right to be involved in the decision-making process” and asked how many attendees agreed that the public does indeed have this right. Five people raised their hands. Out of 60. 

President’s Message: Leah Jaramillo

Another annual general meeting is in the books. These meetings are always a nice way to review the progress we’ve made as an organization and an industry in the past year, as well as to answer questions and receive feedback from members. IAP2 USA continues to grow, (with membership now over 1,200), offer new programs and services and host wonderful events. In case you missed them, we had an outstanding skills symposium in San Diego last February and a stellar conference in Denver in September. In between, we launched four new online trainings and have had a series of fun and informative webinars, not to mention all the chapter meet-ups, events and conferences.

P2 and Disaster Response – IAP2 May Learning Webinar

It sounds like a no-brainer: a stash of millions of pounds of highly-unstable explosives is threatening a town and some explosions have already gone off. Quick! Turn the experts loose to find the solution and act on it! No time to sound out ordinary people on what they think should be done!

But that was exactly the situation in one town in the USA recently, and the experts who studied the problem came back with a “solution” that was even worse and left the area vulnerable to a catastrophic blast.

So they “paused” and took it to the people.

In our May webinar on May 8, at 11:00 AM PDT (2:00 PM EDT), Kristi Celico and Doug Sarno, MCP3, will reprise their presentation from the 2017 IAP2 North American Conference in Denver, will discuss how they helped achieve “consensus in a hurry”, which addressed the issue and averted a disaster. How do you weigh the risks and benefits and make sure local residents are involved in the decision?

Join us to find out how this community solved the problem and how you can apply that to your own work. Register here, and remember the two-stage process to register: follow the link in your registration confirmation email to get the login information you’ll need.

Looking forward to you joining us on May 8!

WEBINAR REWIND: February 2018 – “Handling Emotion and Outrage in Public Participation”

When dealing with conflict and entrenched opinions, do you look for the root causes of the entrenchment? In our February webinar, “Handling Emotion and Outrage in P2”, John Godec, MCP3, looked at some of the reasons why people become polarized in their opinions and why they hold those particular opinions in the first place.

A new benefit for IAP2 USA members: recordings of our webinars are now available exclusively to IAP2 USA members. Check out these and other recorded webinars here.

(One of the IAP2 “Flagship” courses is “Strategies for Dealing with Opposition and Outrage in P2” – formerly known as EOP2 – but this should not be confused with this webinar.)

John pointed out that many of the issues P2 practitioners face today are not new. At the 1997 IAP2 Conference in Phoenix, Chris Gates, president of the National Civic League, described a society made up of angry citizens, ruthless media, broken politics, cynicism and old approaches, as well, Gates added, as “an assumption of bad intent by business and government leaders.”

Sixty years earlier, John noted, Dale Carnegie, the “How to Win Friends and Influence People” guy, stated that “When dealing with people, remember that you are not dealing with creatures of logic, but with creatures of emotion, creatures bristling with prejudice and motivated by pride and vanity.”

John’s research into these root causes, in part, came from trying to understand his own family, many of whom he calls “über-conservatives”. It’s taken him into realms of neuroscience and human behavior, and the work of people like Dr Gail Saltz, a psychiatrist, and Dr. Jonathan Haidt a social psychologist who identify biological differences in brain function between people who hold conservative views and those who self identify as more liberal. In other words, people often become polarized and entrenched in their socio-political positions because they are wired that way.

Grasping that concept and learning to deal with it leads to better thinking when planning a P2 process that you know will be controversial and bring out wildly opposing factions, ensuring that certain voices are not allowed to dominate the scene.

IAP2 USA Members can view this webinar online at: https://iap2usa.org/2018webinars

Note: Members must be logged in to view this content.

 

Webinar Rewind – March 2018: Core Values Award Winners – project categories

Camille Morse Nicholson headshotAlthough climate change is on the minds of pretty much everybody, one group has been routinely left out of the policy conversation: rural residents. Farmers, ranchers and others who live outside our big cities have found that policy designed by urban and suburban interests often fails to address the distinctive realities and challenges they experience.

The Saint Paul, Minnesota-based Jefferson Center joined with the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy to create the “Rural Climate Dialogues”, in which people in three rural Minnesota communities hosted Citizen Juries to deliberate on the topic of climate and extreme weather, and create solutions that worked for them.

Camille Morse Nicholson, Program Coordinator at the Jefferson Center, outlined some of the different techniques required to build community support in advance of the dialogue, facilitate the jury’s work, and support the communities in their follow-up. Although a divisive debate is a possibility with such a politically-loaded topic, one participant remarked, “there was no political/ideological divisiveness: everything was done with respect and in good order.”

The dialogues continue with a focus on the future of energy in rural Minnesota, and the project has already won the Core Values Award for “Creativity and Innovation.”


Dealing with the prospect of closing schools is a touchy subject in the best of conditions, but throw in language and other cultural differences, and things get even trickier.

Rockandel bio pict_sm (1)That was the challenge faced by the Richmond BC School District when faced with the need to do seismic upgrading on their buildings, in a zone identified as prone to liquefaction in case of an earthquake. The potential hit to the budget meant a real potential for closing some schools. This meant taking it to the people, which led to a Core Values Award for the District and Catherine Rockandel of Rockandel and Associates.

The Award — for “Respect for Diversity, Inclusion and Culture” — recognized the work done to reach out to families in a place where sixty percent of households do not have English as a first language. Languages in Richmond include Mandarin, Cantonese, Taiwanese, Tagalog, Punjabi and some Japanese. Moreover, many of the immigrants come from cultures which mistrust governments and officialdom in general.

What tools and techniques did they use to encourage people to take part and trust that their voices are being heard and taken seriously? How did they reach a conclusion in which no schools were closed?

IAP2 USA Members can view this webinar online at: https://iap2usa.org/2018webinars

Note: Members must be logged in to view this content.

 

 

Webinar Rewind – “Denver Encore: Beginning with the Brain in Mind”

A growing challenge for a P2 practitioner is the deepening ideological divide that has developed over the past few decades. As people become more and more entrenched in their view and less and less likely to consider those of others, engaging the broadest cross-section of the public becomes more and more difficult.

Dr Martin Carcasson with the Center for Public Deliberation at Colorado State University says finding a solution begins with understanding the root of the problem – the “brain science” behind polarization – and the December webinar was an encore of his presentation at the 2017 IAP2 North American Conference, “Beginning With The Brain In Mind”.

carcasson - books
Lots of books have been written on the subject

Our human nature makes things problematic, Carcasson says. We crave certainty and consistency, and if we’re making a decision in a controversial or even polarized environment, we tend to protect that decision as much as possible, even in the face of contrary facts.

What’s more, people are suckers for the good-versus-evil narrative – through all cultures and all times, we love the hero-and-villain scenario, and Carcasson says that we’re teaching our children wrong by teaching them that there is an evil force behind bad things, when really, it’s more complicated than that.

We are “groupish” or tribal, preferring to associate with like-minded people. Some of the worst things – and some of the best things – that humans have done in history have stemmed from that mind-set.

Call for Session Proposals!

IAP2 Canada and IAP2 USA are seeking session proposals for the 7th Annual IAP2 North American Conference to be held September 5-7, 2018 in Victoria, BC, Canada.

This is an opportunity to explore the theme, Growing a Culture of P2, with content focusing on topics that Innovate, Inspire, Include, Influence, and Imagine!

Please review the Call for Session Proposals first as it contains information on what the Program Committee is looking for and tips on what to include in your Session Proposal Application.

The majority of the sessions will be in English, however, we plan to include some bilingual sessions. Please indicate in the application if you would like to make your presentation in French and English (simultaneous interpretation will not be provided).

The deadline to submit a proposal is Monday, February 12, 2018!